Get a Glimpse into the World of Emily Summers with “Distinctly Modern Interiors”

by | Mar 8, 2019 | Design, Featured

Emily Summers new book from Rizzoli.
© 2019 Distinctly Modern Interiors by Emily Summers, Rizzoli New York.

Distinctly Modern Interiors by Emily Summers with Marc Kristal is a beautiful body of work that highlights Summers’ interiors over the years. With an engaging foreword by Pamela Fiori, who first fell in love with the designer’s work on a trip to Dallas during her tenure as editor-in-chief of Town & Country, the book is a must read for design lovers of all styles, modernists, of course, included.  

A Dallas home designed by Emily Summers.

From Summers’ renovation of her Dallas home, Touchstone House, designed by MIT-trained architect Robert Johnson Perry in 1965, to her stunning homes in Colorado Springs and Palm Springs, Distinctly Modern Interiors offers Summers’ fans a glimpse into how she lives. And that’s not all, the book is a fascinating read on how Summers arrived where she is now. From an early life growing up in the Midwest with a mother that wielded an astute decorating hand, the designer voraciously studied all things art, architecture, and interiors, and traveled as much as possible. Her early career alone included a co-owned firm specializing in commercial work, an award for a desk she co-designed for Dunbar, three years as the Director of Exhibitions and Funding for the Dallas Museum of Art, and a role on the Washington-based Advisory Council for Historic Preservation—a position for which she was directly recruited to by President George W. Bush.

Today, Emily Summers Design Associates encompasses a team of architects, designers, and art consultants, and consistently works with artists and creatives of all types. The interiors in this book reflect a well-curated eye, a love of color, nature, biophilic design, and above all, a love of collaborating with each and every client.

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